Author Kathryn Curzon

Kathryn has lived in the UK, Egypt, South Africa and New Zealand and is a trained scuba diving instructor and Great White shark safari guide. She is the author of No Damage (December 2014), the Managing Editor of The Scuba News New Zealand, a freelance writer, public speaker and co-founder of the marine conservation cause Friends for Sharks (August 2014). In 2015 she organised and completed a 10-month global speaking tour in aid of shark conservation: 87 events, 8 countries, 7000 people. Learn more about Kathryn’s book, No Damage at: http://www.kathrynhodgsonauthor.com/books/no-damage/

Featured Diver: PT Hirschfield of Pink Tank Scuba

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Diver Profile Full Name: PT Hirschfield Age: Sorry, could you please repeat the question? Live In: Mornington Peninsula, Melbourne, Australia Working For: Pink Tank Scuba Diver Qualifications: Master Diver When, where and why did you start diving? I did my first trial dive on the Great Barrier Reef during a vacation on Magnetic Island in Queensland, Australia. In my very limited frame of reference at the time, the only reason people went to tropical islands was to scuba dive. So I booked a Discover Scuba session during the three hour boat ride out to Kelso Reef. I didn’t dive again until…

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AirBuddy – Changing the Face of Tankless Diving

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A group of Australian divers are changing the world of tankless diving by introducing the AirBuddy. This portable system offers up to 45 minutes of dive time for one diver up to 12 metres of depth and is both lightweight and small; consisting of just a battery-powered air compressor, a regulator and hose. The 12-volt battery takes 3.5 hours to charge using a standard electrical socket. AirBuddy’s inventor Jan Kadlec confirmed they created the product to provide an easy way to do self-guided dives in shallow waters and are not trying to replace conventional scuba equipment: “We aren’t trying to…

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Researchers Discover Why Humpback Whales Jump

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Researchers in Australia have discovered why humpback whales jump. Researchers working in Queensland, Australia have discovered humpback whales breach to communicate with other pods of whales over 4 km (2.5 miles) apart. Wanting to know why these whales breach when migrating, researchers observed 94 different groups of whales during their migration to Antarctica. Their findings were published in Marine Mammal Science in November 2016. The research into humpback whales surface behaviours was conducted as part of the Behavioural Response of Australian Humpback Whales to Seismic Surveys (BRAHSS) project at Peregian Beach, Queensland. The researchers wanted to know why humpback whales…

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Best of: New Zealand’s South Island

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The South Island of New Zealand is known for its diverse and spectacular landscapes including remote national parks, golden beaches, World Heritage status rainforests, glaciers, and Mount Cook. Made famous by The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, it is a popular holiday destination for those seeking outdoor adventures and adrenaline highs.

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Top 5 places for holiday season diving

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Cozumel, Mexico Lying 10km off the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, Cozumel is a popular scuba diving destination with warm water, great visibility and the Cozumel Reefs National Marine Park. There are many dives to enjoy within the national park including dive sites for novices and experienced divers looking for more challenging, remote dives. Cozumel also has white sand beaches, a great party atmosphere and friendly locals, making it ideal for a festive season holiday for all. Try Dive Paradise or Pro Dive Mexico. Nassau, Bahamas Nassau is home to the Bahamas Christmas Arts Festival, an International Film Festival, a Festival…

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Top Tips for Safe Dives

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Australia has experienced a tragic week with the loss of six people who died scuba diving or snorkelling in Australian waters. C McKenzie from the Association of Marine Park Tourism Operators has reminded the press that the global average for a fatality when diving is one per 100,000 dives. He went on to state that in Queensland, the fatality rate is one per 450,000 dives – a record that is 4.5 times better than the global industry’s average. The Australian Underwater Federation is considering the need to review Australian standards in the wake of these accidents. Our sympathy is with…

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